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Chuck
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I'm a css newbie and I'd appreciate some help with my site:

http://www.macspice.com/userguide/

I use a fixed div ('crumbTrail') at the top of the page for the breadcrumbs, and I'd like my content to scroll leaving the crumbs and the menu on the left fixed. It all works pretty much as I'd like except when one clicks on a link to an anchor, for example:

3.2 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT SOURCES

the corresponding anchor is placed at the top of the window by browsers and the text "3.2 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT SOURCES" is obscured by the fixed div.

Is there a way I can get my anchors positioned relative to the bottom of the crumbTrail div, i.e. a couple of em below the the top of the window.

At the moment the site is script free so I'd prefer to solve the problem within the css which is at

http://www.macspice.com/style.css

if possible.

Thanks in advance

Charles

Triumph (not verified)
Anonymous's picture
Guru

My quick guess is that it's

My quick guess is that it's probably the misuse of absolute positioning.

You don't have an <html> tag. I didn't look beyond that.

Strangely enough, it still validates without the opening html tag. :shrug:

Chuck
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Triumph wrote:You don't have

Triumph wrote:
You don't have an <html> tag. I didn't look beyond that.
Strangely enough, it still validates without the opening html tag. :shrug:

Ack, not even the w3c validator can be trusted! Anyway, the <html> tags are there now, but no improvement in the behaviour.

Triumph wrote:
My quick guess is that it's probably the misuse of absolute positioning.

I'll Google for 'css misuse of absolute positioning' and see if I can find enlightenment.

Thanks

Charles

Triumph (not verified)
Anonymous's picture
Guru

Chuck wrote:I'll Google for

Chuck wrote:
I'll Google for 'css misuse of absolute positioning' and see if I can find enlightenment.

Why look somewhere else? Our very own Tyssen has done a smashing job here.

magburner
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Despite what triumph would

Despite what Triumph would have you believe, it has nothing at all to do with the 'abuse of absolute positioning'. The fact that you stated you had used 'fixed' instead of 'absolute' positioning, rubbishes his statement in the first place! Wink

The problem (and its not really a problem, but a feature) is, when you have an anchor on a page, the browser lines the first line of the element that the anchor relates to, directly at the top of the browser window. All browsers do this, so it has nothing to do with how you have designed your document. You have probably seen 'skip to content' links on websites you've visited before, well they work on this principle.

Any element that is fixed, is considered to be 'over the top' of anything else (out of the normal flow of the document) even if it occupies the same z-index. So naturally, when you click a link, the anchor will shoot up to the top of the page, and get hidden by anything that is 'fixed' there already.

I remember having a problem a while back with much the same issue, and after a search of the web, I found no answer. An idea I came up with was to hide an anchor in the code on an element that was slightly upstream of the actual anchor place I wanted. I chose to use a span, which could hold the upstream anchor point. Spans are good because they are inline, and if left unstyled, they will fit in perfectly with their surroundings.

There are a couple of drawbacks to this though. First, this idea works on the assumption that you are using a fixed width design. Liquid or fluid width designs could possibly throw out the positioning of the anchor. Second, the use of spans in this context is not at all semantic (they have no meaning/relevance). If you can live with those couple of caveats, this idea might be for you. Unless of course, someone knows how to add a margin to an anchor so it will take into account any fixed element that might be at the top of the page using plain old CSS. Smile

Hugo
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Quote: Strangely enough, it

Quote:

Strangely enough, it still validates without the opening html tag. :shrug:

It will do, html4.01 is phychic it can guess what you intended to write and makes it happen as if by magic.

You dont have to specify 'html', 'body' '/li', '/p' they are all optional

In fact I don't get why we have to write anything?

Before you make your first post it is vital that you READ THE POSTING GUIDELINES!
----------------------------------------------------------------
Please post ALL your code - both CSS & HTML - in [code] tags
Please validate and ensure you have included a full Doctype before posting.
Why validate? Read Me

burlster
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HR Manager might know

That's really interesting. So if for example you were happy with a chunk of space in your text you could sit perhaps an 'HR' in there before the text you wanted anchored, giving that a margin the same height as whatever element it is that sits at the top, and then place the anchor just before the HR element?

That makes me wonder, I haven't heard anyone say anything about HR tags on this site. Are they bad practise now or can they still be used? :?

Thanks

Have YOU said Hello yet?
The CSSCreator Hello Thread

Triumph (not verified)
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Guru

magburner wrote:Despite what

magburner wrote:
Despite what Triumph would have you believe, it has nothing at all to do with the 'abuse of absolute positioning'. The fact that you stated you had used 'fixed' instead of 'absolute' positioning, rubbishes his statement in the first place! Wink

Bah, I can never figure out 90% of the problems that people are talking about anyway because I don't have IE, or even windows so I don't see half of the complaints in action. I did state that I was guessing, eh? Wink

Chuck wrote:
... Anyway, the <html> tags are there now, but no improvement in the behaviour. ...

Sorry about that Chuck. I didn't mean to imply that fixing that would do away with your problem. I just meant that I got sidetracked and didn't look into it further.

Chuck
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magburner wrote:The problem

magburner wrote:
The problem (and its not really a problem, but a feature) is, when you have an anchor on a page, the browser lines the first line of the element that the anchor relates to, directly at the top of the browser window.

This certainly seems to fit the facts. I have a horrible feeling that the correct way to do what I want is to use frames, a cure that I feel is worse than the disease.

magburner wrote:
... Unless of course, someone knows how to add a margin to an anchor so it will take into account any fixed element that might be at the top of the page using plain old CSS.

Your suggestion of moving the anchors in the html to false positions would work but it seems even more of a hack than frames.

I'm beginning to think I'm gonna have to change the site's desgn to accommodate how browsers position anchors.

Thanks for your suggestions

Charles

magburner
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burlster wrote:That's really

burlster wrote:
That's really interesting. So if for example you were happy with a chunk of space in your text you could sit perhaps an 'HR' in there before the text you wanted anchored, giving that a margin the same height as whatever element it is that sits at the top, and then place the anchor just before the HR element?

That makes me wonder, I haven't heard anyone say anything about HR tags on this site. Are they bad practise now or can they still be used? :?

Thanks


Very drool! Smile I was merely making a suggestion, and besides, I said spans, not HR's. Wink

I personally never figured out how to create a work around for the fixed division problem (the span solution was my only thought), but your dry wit furnished me with an idea that I have expanded upon, and I can post some early findings here.

Instead of spans, or HR's Wink, this example uses BR's. They're semantic, and can easily be placed below any paragraph of text. With a little CSS, you can get an element directly below them to line up below a fixed division at the top of the page.

Here is some interim code I have been messing with (whilst I was watching Emerdale Farm). There is obvious room for improvement and optimisation, but the demonstration works. I hope this idea helps a little. Smile

Untitled Document

*, html, body, form, fieldset, h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, p, pre, blockquote, ul, ol, dl, address, dd, li, a {
font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
border:0px;
}

h2, a {
margin-top:25px;
margin-bottom:25px;
color:#fff;
text-align:left;
font-size:x-large;
line-height:0px;
}

body {
text-align:center;
background-color:#1d1d20;
width:100%;
}

p {
font-size:small;
color:#fff;
text-align:left;
margin-bottom:-27.5px;
}

em {
font-size:small;
color:#fff;
text-align:left;
}

br {
margin-top:25px;
margin-bottom:-12.5px;
display:inline;
padding:0px;
}

br#first {
margin-top:-25px;
}

div#fixed {
position:fixed;
top:0px;
left:0px;
width:100%;
height:20px;
background-color:#0033FF;
z-index:2;
}

div#content {
position:relative;
margin: 0 auto;
width:600px;
margin-top:25px;
}

div#navigation {
position:relative;
margin-bottom:-25px;
}

this is random text in the fixed division at the top of the page.

first heading

In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this the last heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.




this is a sample heading



In 1818, the Pennsylvania Ministerium began talks of organizing the various Lutheran church bodies in America, so that they could "stand in some or another in closer connection with one another."[8] At a meeting in Hagerstown, Maryland in October 1820, just such an organization was founded in the General Synod (formally titled the "Evangelical Lutheran General Synod of the United States of North America"). At the outset, this group consisted of the Pennsylvania Ministerium, along with the the New York Ministerium, and the Maryland-Virginia Synod.

The General Synod served largely in an advisory function - each church body within the Synod retained its own constitution and independence. The primary role of the Synod was to facilitate cooperation among the various church bodies. It was under the auspices of the General Synod, with the leadership of Samuel Simon Schmucker, that a Lutheran seminary and college were founded in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[9]

Despite its role in establishing the General Synod, the Pennsylvania Ministerium withdrew from the inter-Lutheran organization in 1823. Within the Ministerium, there was a close relationship between Lutheran and Reformed congregations, and many felt that the General Synod might jeopordize that relationship.[10] In addition, many in the Ministerium were wary of a centralized organization, and the control that it might exert over individual congregations.

Thus, in the years following, the Pennsylvania Ministerium remained an independent Lutheran church body. However, the Ministerium sought to maintain a relationship with the Synod, including continuing to send its ministerial students to the General Synod's seminary in Gettysburg, which was headed by Samuel Schmucker.

In the decades that followed, the Ministerium became less concerned with its relationship with the Reformed church and saw a significant increase in Lutheran identity and the importance of the Lutheran Confessions. Thus, in 1853, the Ministerium rejoined other Lutherans in the General Synod.[11] However, this renewed relationship would prove to be short-lived.

burlster
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Oops!

:bigoops:

Embarrassing confession : I was being serious. I actually meant what I said and thought it was a good idea. I'm guessing it was so ridiculous it went full circle and came out sounding more like sarcasm, haha!

If I wanted to be sarcastic or witty, I'd probably aim for the Emmerdale Farm reference, but then who am I to comment when I watch Hollyoaks!!

Loving your example, good work.

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Hey, no worries man, its all

Hey, no worries man, its all in good humour eh? Smile

I've just had a look at that example in Opera, IE7, and Safari for Windows, and it doesn't work the same as it does for Firefox! Still, a little bit of CSS jiggling should sort it out nicely - the principle is sound, just the mechanics are a little Pete Tong!

Plenty of full circles flying around here, because tt seems like I answered my own sarcastic comment I posted earlier too!

magburner wrote:
Unless of course, someone knows how to add a margin to an anchor so it will take into account any fixed element that might be at the top of the page using plain old CSS. Smile

I was serious about Emmerdale farm though - I love it! :thumbsup:

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I may have made some progress

Provoked to the point of madness by Triumph's allegation of misuse of absolute positioning, I read everything on the w3c site on the subject of CSS. I'm not sure that 'enlightened' exactly describes my state of mind after that lot, but if you now try

3.2 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT SOURCES

it seems that http://www.macspice.com/userguide/ now works pretty much as wanted (tested with Safari 1.3.2) without any nasty hacks. Unfortunately the new approach doesn't work with Internet Explorer, but I've hacked out the bits that actually break it.

Charles

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I am confused

does all this discussion solved the core issue here.. i am confused after reading all this..
:?

Triumph (not verified)
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Chuck wrote:Provoked to the

Chuck wrote:
Provoked to the point of madness by Triumph's allegation of misuse of absolute positioning

Ooh, sorry. I didn't mean to strike so hard. Wink

For the best, really. For help with IE6, which seems to not like position: fixed; on anything other than the body element, there are some articles here. Luckily IE7 is slightly repaired and now can handle it. I hope that helps as I still do not have a copy of IE or even Windows. One more week and I'll be able to see all the troubles that plague us here (that's when I start my new job).

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Clarification

Hi Surajnaikin

I revised the stylesheet in the light of what I learned at w3c. This has fixed the problem originally described in the case of Safari and Firefox and I believe, although I am a CSS newbie so don't take my word for it, that the fix is orthodox.

Internet Explorer 5.2 (Mac) seems to have bugs in it - it doesn't display the slider properly, so I've hacked the CSS so it uses the old buggy version with IE5.2 because ca 9% of the site's vistors are still using IE.

I have no direct way of telling whether the new stylesheet works with other IE variants and/or non-Mac machines.I suspect that it does not, but I don't care too much. The material on the site is only of intest to geeks with Macs and for them it's fine. For everyone else, there's just one more reason to use a standards-compliant broswer.

Charles

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Chuck wrote:Internet

Chuck wrote:
Internet Explorer 5.2 (Mac) seems to have bugs in it - it doesn't display the slider properly, so I've hacked the CSS so it uses the old buggy version with IE5.2 because ca 9% of the site's vistors are still using IE.

Don't bother. IE5/mac is dead, and if MS no longer support it, why should you?

Tell the luddites to upgrade.

Quote:
I have no direct way of telling whether the new stylesheet works with other IE variants and/or non-Mac machines. I suspect that it does not, but I don't care too much. The material on the site is only of intest to geeks with Macs and for them it's fine.

Works fine on Firefox 2.0.0.4 Windows. IE7/Win gets two scrollbars, and the inner one does some funny things when you scroll, but the content is still accessible.

Quote:
For everyone else, there's just one more reason to use a standards-compliant broswer.

If only Wink

Verschwindende wrote:
  • CSS doesn't make pies