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Dirk Diggler
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Hi
I found this site with a technique to replace the old <IFRAME> which uses the property overflow: auto; (previously thought unreliable due to poor browser support).
I tried something similar recently and found browser bugs in Mac IE.

This guy seems to have cured that problem. The xhtml validates too.
Benefits of this technique include, vastly improved accessibility over <IFRAMES>, bettter search engine indexing, and to top it off N4 just renders a list of paragraphs as opposed to a blank space as it cannot render <IFRAMES>. Your design will go out the window in N4, but the main thing is your content is still readable and usable.
http://placenamehere.com/neuralustmirror/200202/fun.php?sheet=10

I found this to work in the folowing browsers;

    Win Internet Explorer 5.0 Win Internet Explorer 5.5
    Win Internet Explorer 6.0
    Mac Internet Explorer 5.2
    Mac Safari 1.1
    Mac Safari 1.2
    Netscape 6.0
    Netscape 7.0
    Opera 7.11
    Opera 7.23
    Mozilla 1.5
    Mozilla Firebird .07
    Mozilla Firefox .08
    Mozilla Firefox 0.9.1

Could this be the end of the <IFRAME> ?
Let me know what you think Smile

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EssentialBuyerGuides
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Is this the death of the &lt;IFRAME&gt;?

Anything that allows people to get away from using IFRAMES has got to be a bonus. Smile

There was talk of frames in general being gradually phased out. Would be good to see, no more sites with 30 scrollbars criss-crossing the screen. Laughing out loud

samf
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why are iframes eeevil?

EssentialBuyerGuides wrote:
Anything that allows people to get away from using IFRAMES has got to be a bonus. Smile

There was talk of frames in general being gradually phased out. Would be good to see, no more sites with 30 scrollbars criss-crossing the screen. Laughing out loud

What if a good designer wantes to have ONE scrollbar crisscrossing the screen? And they don't care about search engine finding and all of the other issues? More specifically, I use iframes (inside a div tag with style="display:none;") as a way to send data to the server, and then have code come back in the iframe saying

<div id="someTag"> new content here </div> <script>window.parent.document.getElementById('someTag').innerHTML=document.getElementById('someTag').innerHTML;</script>

I am just beginning to wade through the wc3's specifications and determine what my company needs to do, however a question:

1. are iframes now "illegal" as part of a "strict" DTD; and if so will frames be next? I'm a) concerned about the life span of my product of couse but also b) annoyed that someone would tell me "sorry Sam but this ingenious use of iframes to get server data back without refreshing the page is no longer good enough - you'll just have to use AJAX". That to me seems against the innovation that I've always found the web to be about.

2. any references to iframes being deprecated? basic question is, if I have a transitional or even strict page which does something like:

document.write('<iframe ... ></iframe>');

will that page work in IE or FF 5 years from now?

thanks,
Sam

2.

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thepineapplehead
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Is this the death of the &lt;IFRAME&gt;?

Holy Crap, where did you come from?

I don't think they will stop working in newer browsers; newer browsers add support for new things, they don't seem to remove support for older things.

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