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Alan
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Hi there,

I have a question regarding design standards when naming files & folders on a website. I know everyone has their own different way of doing these things, but what's the best way...

Imagine you've got a very simple HTML website, with 5 pages on it. Should these HTML pages be on the same level as the domain, for example:

http://domain.co.uk/page1.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page2.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page3.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page4.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page5.htm

Or should you put each of the pages in a folder with the name of the page, and rename the page.htm file as index.htm:

http://domain.co.uk/page1/index.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page2/index.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page3/index.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page4/index.htm
http://domain.co.uk/page5/index.htm

I'm not sure what the best way to do it is. The first option seems the more simple way.

But then, whenever you hear web addresses quoted in magazines or on TV, people never give out .htm adddresses. Instead, you'll hear something like "check out domain.co.uk/page1". So the second option has the advantage that all you need to give out is the folder name, and then users will be automatically sent to the index.htm file within the folder.

Can anyone share some knowledge on the subject?

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co2
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Naming files & folders

Option 1 definitely! Why create more processor work?

I understand your point though. Normally if a site is much larger, it's sensible to split the pages into sub-directory sections. i.e.:

root
-- index.htm
-- contact.htm
-- about.htm

products
-- products01.htm
-- products02.htm

services
-- service01.htm
-- service02.htm

... etc etc. This is obviously a simplified example, and things change if dynamic data is involved.

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