My own framework
47% (59 votes)
Don't use one
37% (47 votes)
YUI Grids
2% (3 votes)
Blueprint CSS
2% (3 votes)
YAML CSS Framework
1% (1 vote)
Boilerplate
0% (0 votes)
Reset only
6% (8 votes)
Other
4% (5 votes)
Total votes: 126

I have default screen and

I have default screen and print stylesheets which I use as a starting point for all my sites. I had been using Eric Meyer's reset until recently but have stopped using it because I've found it's not really necessary anymore as I explicitly specify most of my margins/padding etc anyway.

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I was using Meyer's reset

I was using Meyer's reset for a while, too. Not so much anymore though.

I don't really use a framework but I have a few files that I rely on such as a form layout (CSS and Markup) that I tend to use a lot. I was planning to update them a bit but never did find the time or the gumption.

I've never thought that

I've never thought that zeroing all the margins, etc. was a good idea. It just meant you had to go behind the elephants with a shovel and pail putting things back to right.

The closest I come to a css template is a chart of relative font sizes, their leading and margins, for maintaining the vertical typographic rhythm. The graphic designer is likely to specify the scale to use, so the specific font sizes are not predetermined.

I can't think of anything (other than browser defaults) that you can know ahead of time.

cheers,

gary

Unplanned code results in a tangled wad of brain-cramping confusion.

There are enough html & css demos and tutorials to be interesting. Please visit.

Never used one, don't really

Never used one, don't really consider there is such a thing?

Like the others I tend to work from a default sheet that describes a few basics, I have always tended to zero margins but I then will set them again for primary elements such as h#, p, ul . I do find that really this whole aspect is not actually an issue once you understand the necessity for the control, then you can run with either doing so globally or as required.

Recently I have dropped the universal selector reset, only because of the possible/probable? problems it has for form elements (never bothered me frankly) and adopted the Meyer approach of specifying 20000 distinct selectors to act on; however I found a problem there in the use of font-weight:inherit which has issues cross browser and had to be removed post haste( firming up my prior belief that I'm never too keen on these sorts of techniques that seem to become universally accepted as some form of coding gospal, which everyone slavishly adheres to, even if the author is of undoubted magnificence Smile.

In future I will probably not use any reset, rather relying on specifying where/when required.

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I don't use anything

I don't use anything specifically, other than my reset, and I also find myself either copying or at least referring to old things I've done like forms, menus, and things like techniques/models (100% height, fake frames, rounded corners, stupid stuff like that). I ended up making different folders with the examples as a personal reference.

My universal reset is still the same. I can't make myself list 2000 elements just to avoid forms, plus I've found my forms still don't line up and look like garbage without being zero'd anyway, so I just

* {
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
}

img, fieldset {
border: 0;
}

ul, li {
list-style: none;
}

/*if tables*/
table {
border-collapse: collapse;
}

and that pretty much goes on every page. But that's not a framework is it?

gary wrote:

I've never thought that zeroing all the margins, etc. was a good idea. It just meant you had to go behind the elephants with a shovel and pail putting things back to right.

The things we designers do to have total, unmitigated, dictatorial, despotic and tyrannical visual control between browsers, esp when the bosses ask, "why does it look, like, all crappy and stuff on MY machine?" I think everyone should have been starting at zero from the first place though. I don't want some browser adding their goofy garbage on my page unless its user specifically demands it. And then, if the page looks goofy, their fault not mine : )

I'm no expert, but I fake one on teh Internets

Quote:The things we

Quote:

The things we designers do to have total, unmitigated, dictatorial, despotic and tyrannical visual control between browsers, esp when the bosses ask, "why does it look, like, all crappy and stuff on MY machine?" I think everyone should have been starting at zero from the first place though. I don't want some browser adding their goofy garbage on my page unless its user specifically demands it. And then, if the page looks goofy, their fault not mine : )

Laughing out loud

Personally, I'd tell the boss it may be time to upgrade from Mosaic.Tongue

Out of curiosity, and this may certainly expose my ignorance, just exactly which margin defaults are causing the issues among them; the big 4 browsers, that is?

cheers,

gary

Unplanned code results in a tangled wad of brain-cramping confusion.

There are enough html & css demos and tutorials to be interesting. Please visit.

Ah, mostly in lists and

Ah, mostly in lists and forms, as well as any pages with small spaces. For instance, the distances between headers and their following p's ended up looking okay on some pages I began on waay back when, but when the guy who wants to style the page to his users' tastes saw it, he was like "Well could you move that up a little and that down and move that text over to the left a little" and doing so for say FF would give too much or too little in IE-- IE and FF being the main browsers anyone here cares about (I test for Saffy, Konq and Opera, but this is the Netherlands, land of the Internet Browser Stone Age).

On a clear, loose, spacy page I'm sure they don't matter. But I've had to learn to pack a suitcase as full as it can by careful use of every available cm-- so having one browser add a few px here or there while the other doesn't means I have to have extra space, and I don't, esp when I'm still catering to 600x800 window-sizes (my choice, but I stand by it).

Forms I've found only fit when px or em-perfect. Ems let me keep stuff from wrapping and misaligning, but this means I do need to zero margins and padding... I don't see margins causing any problems with forms, it's the padding messing with inputs that was causing the problems. What I should do in my next forms is try not to zero padding on them, since adding it back only in the places I need it isn't possible cross-browser. Though I cringe at the idea of listing every fricking element except form elements for padding... it feels like a Bad Thing and so it probaly is.

So again, forms, lists, spaces between various adjascent boxes such as headers + p.. I like knowing for sure that the width I declare on a bunch of floats is correct and that some browser from gawdknowswhere doesn't come along and add default side padding, screwing with my floats for instance. In the early days I had
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
on so many things-- now they are consolidated in a single statement.

The despotic control thing does conflict with my inherent laziness though. It's a ying-yang.

I'm no expert, but I fake one on teh Internets

sometimes it is a good idea

when you design a very cool looking complex layout, u need to take full advantage of all margins, padding, etc.. When I was a total n00b I used to stress out on a simple layout with 3 columns and a header, then I didn't know with padding inside of a 100% cell screws the the thing up, remember, everything is crucial in css if you want something to look good. Smile